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To consult the Magazine La Gregoriana Web Page

Il Collegio Romano dalla restituzione alla Rivoluzione (1848), n. 48 To consult the file 48_44_collegio_romano_it.pdf

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P. Busa tra metodo tomista e linguistica computazionale, n. 46 To consult the file 46_38_busa_it.pdf

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Per una pedagogia attiva. Dall’esperimento all’esperienza, n. 46 To consult the file 46_43_brodeur_it.pdf

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La Ratio studiorum: pedagogia e contenuti, n. 45 To consult the file 45_36_collegio_romano_it.pdf

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Un codice pedagogico per la Compagnia di Gesù, n. 44 To consult the file 44_34_collegio_romano_it.pdf

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L'ordinamento degli studi prima della Ratio Studiorum (1551-1586), n. 43 To consult the file 43_30_collegio_romano.pdf

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La fondazione del Collegio Romano, n. 42 To consult the file 42_40_collegio_romano.pdf

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Historical Hints (in Italian) (PDF, 209 Kb.)  To consult the Historical Hints in PDF format

 

Saint Ignatius of Loyola, SI (1491 - 1556)

Saint Ignatius of Loyola, SI (1491 - 1556)

 

University History

Historical Hints

The locations of the PUG
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Celebrating 200 years of Jesuit Restoration 1814-2014

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"Remiamo insieme al servizio della Chiesa!", n. 47 To consult the file 47_02_omelia_Papa_it.pdf

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La Compagnia di Gesù nell'Impero Russo (1772-1820), n. 47 To consult the file 47_07_Inglot_Russia_it.pdf

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La nuova strada del Collegio Romano nell'Ottocento, n. 47 To consult the file 47_11_Coll_collegio_it.pdf

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Pio VII, la Curia romana e il ristabilimento della Compagnia (1814), n. 47 To consult the file 47_15_Regoli_curia_it.pdf

The locations of the Pontifical Gregorian University

In 1551 St. Ignatius of Loyola laid the basis of the Pontifical Gregorian University, founding a free School of Grammar, Humanity and Christian Doctrine in Rome, named for many centuries the Roman College.

In 1583 Gregory XIII endowed the University with a new and larger premises, therefore he was said "founder" and "patron". In memory of its benefactor, later on the Roman College took the name of Gregorian University, whose High Chancellor is the Prefect of the Congregation for Catholic Education and whose Vice-High Chancellor is the Superior.

Pope Pius XI wanted the Pontifical Biblical Institute and the Pontifical Oriental Institute as-sociated with the University.

Each institution is legally distinct, with its own Rector, with its own academic staff and its own administration. These three institutions, closely cooperating with each other through the ex-change of professors, student multiple enrolment and pooling a large number of courses, gather in this way various departments or faculties mainly engaged in research and higher education. They are: